Thursday, 28 February 2013

Glenlivet


Glenlivet, on the north-eastern shore of Lake Kyle, is one of Fort Victoria's most scenic areas.


 Two routes can be taken to Glenlivet from Fort Victoria. Either go out on the Birchenough Bridge road, travel for approximately 27 km, and then turn off to the right; or take the road to the Zimbabwe side of Lake Kyle, cross the dam wall and continue on the scenic Murray McDougall Drive, which offers some of the finest mountain scenery in the district, through tribal trust lands,


 The area runs along the Mtilikwe arm of the lake, and at several points on the road overlooking the tranquil waters, most attractive laybys have been made. Long stretches of the road are flanked by well-wooded areas of tall gum trees, stretching to the backdrop of the colourful Nyuni Mountains, which are especially attractive during September, when the Msasa (small shrubby African tree having compound leaves and racemes of small fragrant green flowers are in full bloom.) There is an abundance of bird life.


 A family hotel with a lake view nestles in the folds of the hills, and there is a caravan park on the shoreline, where boats and caravans are available for hire. Fishing and boating are popular in the area.

 Further information and brochures available from
 Fort Victoria-Zimbabwe Publicity
 P.O. Box 340, Fort Victoria


End

Source: Rhodesia Calls Magazine dated, January - February 1975 made available by Denise Taylor. Thanks Denise
Extracted and recompiled by Eddy Norris for use on "Our Rhodesian Heritage" blog.
 

Thanks to the author, the photographer, the publishers for the use of their material.
 
Comments are always welcome, please mail them to Eddy Norris at orafs11@gmail.com
 
(Please visit our previous posts and archives)


Recommended reading.  The story of Triangle http://thestoryoftriangle.blogspot.com/

Ref. Rhodesia

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5 Comments:

At 5 March 2013 at 09:31 , Blogger Rhodesia Remembered said...

Boet Van Der Walt (RhAF) Writes:-

My brother-in-law and sister farmed on the south side of Nyuni mountain on the farm Chevdon from 1945.

When the Kyle dam was built it actually cut his farm in half, they paid him to build a small bridge on the east side of his farm over the Bevumi river in order to reach the south side of his farm.

Glenlivet was over the mountain north of the farm, we visited there quite often. There was a footpath up the mountain from Glenlivet and if you climbed to the top you could drink whatever the previous climbers had left under a rock at the summit but you had to replace it with your own drink.

 
At 5 March 2013 at 09:31 , Blogger Rhodesia Remembered said...

Louis D. Hartley Writes:-

When last I heard Glenlivet Hotel is still functioning commercially as a hotel.
The major problem is that one of the outlet gates in Kyle wall ( Lake Mutirikwe) is jammed open (no timely repairs and maintenance -a Zanu-Pf ''shamwari'' fiasco ).
This has resulted in the Kyle water level ...shoreline receding dramatically.....the lake is currently measured at around 18 % (after the main rains).... so the water that is usually captured and held ..... is escaping with no control. Sad but true !

 
At 16 March 2013 at 12:23 , Blogger Rhodesia Remembered said...

Deb Addison Writes:-

My Mum and Dad( the lateBob and Margaret Carmody) retired in 1973 at Glenlivet, where they had built their dream retirement home very near where this picture was taken. My husband Allan and I were married at Glenlivet in March 1975.

 
At 16 March 2013 at 12:27 , Blogger Rhodesia Remembered said...

Eddy Norris Writes:-

Please see http://rhodesianheritage.blogspot.com/2013/01/the-late-bob-carmody.html on Bob Carmody.

 
At 11 November 2015 at 10:58 , Blogger I Carruthers said...

Boet van der Walt ~ you must have farmed close to us on Tawamba behind Glenlivet, my late dads horse new it's way home from the hotel over the neck in the mountain you recall. Ron Carruthers & Ray Sparrow would chase down Eland & toss their hats on the horns as a past time. . . . . Legends
Ian Carruthers

 

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